Research Has Found That Too Much Added Sugar May Harm the Immune System

The results of a study have suggested that eating a diet high in the sugar fructose may hinder the proper functioning of the immune system in ways that have been largely unknown so far.1✅ JOURNAL REFERENCE
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-21461-4

Fructose is a single sugar known as monosaccharide which is naturally found in fruit and some other foods such as honey. It’s the manufactured forms of fructose like high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and processed sugars that are a potential health risk.

Consuming high quantities of fructose from whole fruits is difficult, but it’s easy to consume high amounts of HFCS and other kinds of added sugar found in processed foods and sugary drinks.

Fructose is a common ingredient in sweets, sugary drinks, and processed foods and is commonly made use of in the production of food. It's linked to obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes and its consumption has substantially increased through the entire developed world in the past few decades. Understanding the effect that fructose has on the immune system of individuals who eat it in high levels has however been limited.

This study shows that fructose results in the immune system becoming inflamed and that process then creates more reactive molecules that are linked to inflammation. Inflammation of this kind can go on to harm tissues and cells and contribute to body systems and organs no longer functioning as they should and could result in disease.

The research also provides a deeper understanding of how fructose could be connected to obesity and diabetes, as low-level inflammation is often linked to obesity. The results support the growing body of evidence regarding the harmful impact of consuming high fructose levels.

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