Research Has Found That Any Exercise Effectively Relieves Anxiety

According to a study, moderate as well as strenuous exercise can help alleviate anxiety symptoms, regardless of whether the disorder is chronic or not. The study is based on 286 individuals who had anxiety syndrome. The average age of the study participants was 39 years, 70% were women, and half of them had endured anxiety for at least 10 years.1✅ JOURNAL REFERENCE
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2021.10.006

They were designated to either moderate or strenuous group exercise sessions for 12 weeks. The outcomes revealed that their symptoms of anxiety were alleviated significantly, regardless of whether the participants were suffering from chronic or acute anxiety, in comparison to a control group who had been given physical activity advice based on public health recommendations.

The majority of individuals in the exercise treatment groups improved from a baseline moderate to high anxiety level to a level of low anxiety after the 12-week program. The odds of improvement in terms of symptoms of anxiety increased by a factor of 3.62 for those individuals who exercised at a fairly low intensity. The corresponding factor was 4.88 for individuals who exercised at a higher intensity. Individuals did not know about the counseling or physical training individuals outside their group were experiencing.

There was a substantial intensity improvement trend, meaning the more intensely the participants exercised, the more symptoms of anxiety improved. Prior research of physical exercise in depression has revealed clear improvements in symptoms.

Both treatment groups participated in 1-hour training sessions 3 times per week, under the guidance of a physical therapist. The sessions included strength training exercises as well as aerobic exercises. A warm-up was accompanied by circle training around 12 stations for 45 minutes, and sessions finished with a cool down and stretching.

Individuals in the moderate exercise level group were meant to achieve some 60% of their maximum heart rate, a level of exertion regarded as light or moderate. In the intensive training group, the intention was to achieve 75% of maximum heart rate, a degree of exertion that’s regarded as high.

Intensity levels were validated regularly making use of the Borg scale, an established perceived physical exertion rating scale, and confirmed with heart rate monitors.

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